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3621 North Wells Fargo Avenue   •   Scottsdale, Arizona 85251   •   480-882-5566
On the campus of HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center

About laser spine surgery

Because of the appearance of TV ads about laser spine surgery, we are often asked by patients and other family physicians about our use of lasers in spine surgery and if there is benefit to the patient who may need spine surgery.

Everyone wishes for a miracle drug or miracle surgery for a herniated disc, or back pain and neck pain symptoms. Spine surgery has seen lots of innovations and fads — from chymopapain (an enzyme injection to dissolve herniated discs) in the 1970s, to percutaneous discectomy in the 1980s, the emergence of IDET (intradiscal electrothermic therapy to heat the disc) in the 2000s and lastly a variety of artificial discs that attempt to replicate the shock absorption capabilities of the normal healthy disc in the spine.

Many of these new techniques or spine surgeries generated incredible media interest at the beginning, combined with TV and magazine ads, along with new surgeons who use this new “technology”. Historically, most of these “advances” have been shown to have limited benefit for most patients. Some of the above, have actually proved to be harmful to some patients.

Laser spine surgery is a new buzzword that has been the subject of TV ads and publicity. Using a laser in spine surgery is not necessarily modern, as the laser typically is used by the surgeon as a cutting device. The only real difference between how traditional or minimally invasive spine surgery is performed, compared to laser disc removal, is how the damaged disc tissue is removed. In a typical spine surgery, a window through bone is created to enable the spine surgeon to remove the herniated disc. Under traditional spine surgery, the surgeon may use a microscope or endoscope to visualize a herniated disc that is pressing on a nearby nerve root. The surgeon then removes the problematic disc tissue with a tiny cutting tool.

With laser spine surgery, the surgeon uses the laser to heat and then vaporize the disc tissue. Additionally, laser surgery works best as a cutting tool against soft tissues but is not the ideal instrument for removing bone spurs that are can be present with older patients who have stenosis.

The other concern some detractors may cite for laser spine surgery is that the laser has limitations in the three dimensional manner a laser cuts through tissue, and how depth of the incision is controlled with a laser. While a spine surgeon can easily control depth with a traditional cutting tool with pressure, the same is not the case with a laser which can perforate.

Secondly, if you were to also consider industrial lasers are used to cut through metal and steel, would you really want such a cutting tool around your spinal cord?

Our position at Spine Group Arizona is consistent with the nation’s largest association of spine surgeons: North American Spine Society (NASS). NASS recently published a position paper that cautioned consumers about laser spine surgery. According to the NASS position paper:

“Laser spine surgery in the cervical or lumbar spine is NOT indicated at this time. Due to lack of high quality clinical trials concerning laser spine surgery with the cervical or lumbar spine, it cannot be endorsed as an adjunct to open, minimally invasive, or percutaneous surgical techniques. There are no high quality studies to support a recommendation for cervical or lumbar laser spine surgery.” The NASS position can be accessed by clicking here.

Another area that concerns us about laser spine surgery, is that the TV ads encourage a person to have laser spine surgery when they may not need surgery at all. Some experts in the United States estimate that 50% of spine surgery may be unnecessary. That’s why health insurance companies may require a second opinion.

For example, Spine Group Arizona is able to help many patients resolve their symptoms from a herniated disc WITHOUT SURGERY.

In summary, at this time, we don’t see any real clinical benefit to laser spine surgery over minimally invasive spine surgery. As a result, we do NOT perform laser spine surgery, nor do we use lasers during spine surgery simply for the sake of advertising.

Minimally invasive surgery — the real advance in spine surgery

Something that we believe to be more newsworthy are the new “minimally invasive spine surgery” approaches that shorten the incision, lessen time in the hospital, and speed the return to activity with a less painful recovery.

With that said, many spine surgeons are also throwing that buzzword and the MISS acronym around as bait to attract patients when they really aren’t trained in minimally invasive technology and instrumentation. When a surgeon makes a smaller than normal incision he or she may call that approach “minimally invasive.”

But what really defines “minimally invasive surgery” is the use of endoscopes and cannula that have cameras and cutting tools in the tips to enable the spine surgeon to see inside the body without a large surgical opening. Using these special tools, the trained surgeon can then remove a herniated disc.

Other instrumentation enables the surgeon to insert screws and fixation plates through a tiny opening rather than a larger two or three inch incision. While this technique can be more demanding for the surgeon, and requires far more training, the tiny incision is of great benefit to the patient because it causes less disruption to muscles and ligaments which in turn provides a less painful recovery after surgery.

Another misleading claim that some spine surgeons make is that they call a procedure a “micro-discectomy” to imply that the incision is tiny. But in reality, the incision is the same. Instead, the operating room simply has a microscope and the surgeon maneuvers it in front of his eyes for five minutes simply to state that a microscope was used.

Spine Group Arizona is certainly an advocate of new technology where it shows benefit to the patient. More importantly, our belief is that the best spine care should exhaust non-surgical treatment options first, and use spine surgery as the last option. We don’t believe in misleading patients about miracle cures, gadgets and gizmos.

We have developed this content-rich online encyclopedia about spine care to help people learn what really is causing their back pain, and how it can best be treated.

In that sense, an educated health care consumer is more likely to realize the best healthcare through their choice of a physician who shares information.

Do you NEED spine surgery?


Do you have pain that radiates into an arm or leg?

   Yes    No

Do you have any numbess or weakness in a foot or hand?

   Yes    No

Have you had an MRI within the last 12 months?

   Yes    No

Provide contant information below so we can advise you based on your above symptoms:

   

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Frederick F. Marciano, M.D., Ph.D.

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John E. Wanebo, M.D.

Board Certified Neurosurgeon

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